How to Root Herbs the Organic Way Plus DIY Bouquet Garni


Happy Wednesday, Friends! While buying organic may stretch a frugal lifestyle, growing your own organic herbs saves money and has countless benefits. In addition to cooking, I also use herbs as landscaping and often in my decor. Though they have a lovely delicate appearance, they are resilient and oh-so-fragrant. Today I'm sharing two simple and thrifty DIY projects featuring these green beauties. 


how to root herbs the organic way


Would you believe that these large rosemary bushes bordering the entrance to my garden started from small cuttings I rooted myself? Honest! No chemicals or expensive organic gardening products were used.


how to root herbs organically


All you need is fresh herb cuttings, a clear bottle--or even a glass and...water! Make sure to remove leaves from the part of the stem that will be in water, like the mint below. Then just stick it in a bottle of water, like the rosemary. New to gardening and need some cuttings to root? Find fresh cut organic here!


how to root herbs the organic way


Place it in a sunny window sill and in two weeks or less, you should start to see little hair-like roots. At this point, transplant it to a small pot of soil, around four inches or so. Once it thrives, it can be transplanted to garden soil. This is exactly the technique I used for the two bushes at my garden entrance! 


how to root herbs the organic way


If you've tried to grow herbs before and failed, try again! I'll let you in on a secret, I don't have much luck growing little pots of herbs inside the house. If you've had the same issue, don't decide you have a black thumb--look what happened when I got those babies in the ground! Did I give my soil special treatment before planting them? Nope! While I am careful to garden chemical free, the beauty of herbs is that they can thrive even in the poorest soils, like this oregano in my rocky Texas soil. 


the organic way to root herbs


In my Cupcakes and Coffee in the Garden Fall Tablescape post, I shared that I like to create fragrant bouquet garnis as small  hostess gifts that look lovely at any table. {By the way, the tablescape blog hop features new tablescapes daily, so be sure to check it out--just click on the cupcake link above.}


DIY bouquet garni


If you haven't used a bouquet garni before, simply put it's just a small aromatic bouquet of herbs to flavor soups and sauces. There are several ways to make one, including wrapping it in cloth. As you might expect, I opt for the simplest approach, which is just tying kitchen twine around a small bundle of selected herbs. Traditionally, the bundle includes parsley, bay leaves and rosemary. My favorite combination is rosemary, thyme and oregano. Here, I've tied them together.


DIY bouquet garni


Next, the ends can be double wrapped around the stems and knotted, which is how I tied the hostess gifts. Note, the twine shouldn't be wax coated because it will remain on the herbs during cooking. Last, the entire bouquet is removed before serving. It's really simple. 


DIY bouquet garni


Today I've shared a pinnable graphic for each project. Choose your favorite, or both!



My Thrift Store Addiction



how to root herbs the organic way



DIY bouquet garni


My Thrift Store Addiction signature



MY HEARTFELT THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING FOR FEATURING THIS POST: 


Sew It Cook It Craft It Link Party - Sew Historically 150









party link

10 comments:

  1. Great information! Since our growing season is short, I may try to do this indoors although I know that's usually a 'hit or miss' thing.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I cannot believe that Rosemary and Oregano. WOW and WOW! Girl, now you got yourself some wonderful Herbs. I love it! I have not tried to root any. I might just try it. I love herbs. I love to smell them and cook with them. Thanks for sharing. Hugs and blessings, Cindy

    ReplyDelete
  3. Although my mint and oregano are thriving, I can't seem to get rosemary to survive. Maybe I will have better luck with it at the farm. Anyway, now I know it is easy to start it from cuttings! How did I not know that? Thanks for the information, Cecilia!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wish we had the same temperate weather you have down south. Things die outside in the winter here unless they're very winter-hardy! I did have luck this summer though with potted rosemary both inside and outside! I'll be bringing it in once frost hits. My husband grows oregano in his garden. We used to have mint growing wild in our yard when I was a kid,loved that smell! Your hostess bouquets are lovely!
    xo Kathleen|Our Hopeful Home

    ReplyDelete
  5. Here in Maine, my oregano and parsley winters over with no protection. The woodchucks have decimated my parsley this year; they have the freshest breath in town! Guess they are not Italian! I gave up on my vegetable gardenthis year; 3 woodies and tomato blight for the last 2 years is discouraging. The pot of chocolate mint on my porch made a lovely batch of iced tea!! God didn't replant my catnip as He usually does; means I'll have to buy catnip for my cat mats. I love throwing herbs into my concoctions; fresh is SOOOO nice! I don't think Al appreciates my oregano flowers in the spaghetti sauce, though. Have started cider vinegar and oregano jars for gifts. Will have to spring for olive oil next!

    ReplyDelete
  6. We share the same passion for herbs! Love this post! I just linked up my summer herbs to the party! I realized after word that there are no food posts, but I think there's plenty of vintage goodness in the post to "qualify" for the party! I LOVE this blog!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I just LOVE herbs and never knew you could grow them from cuttings!! We have just moved into our new house and was only saying to my husband the other day we need to get our herb garden sorted!! I will be trying this for sure from cuttings from our herb pot plants!

    Thank you for sharing over at Waste Not Wednesday!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Great information especially as we head into winter. Nice to take cuttings and enjoy the herbs inside this winter. Thanks for sharing your post on the Simple Homestead Hop, as one of the co-hosts I will be featuring your post on Thursday! Hope you stop by again!
    - Nancy

    ReplyDelete
  9. herbs are something my mother not only used a lot of but also grew a lot of. Thanks for sharing
    come see us at http://shopannies.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  10. I love the little hostess gifts at each place setting. Such a nice touch, and the acorn too. Those are good tips for propagating the herbs. Surprising what will root in water like that. All my mint died this year. I have no idea why, but my Creeping Jenny is still hanging on, though it's not an herb.

    ReplyDelete

I absolutely love to read your thoughtful comments and enjoy responding to each one! I respond by email to be sure you receive it but your email address is always kept confidential. Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts!